This is the journal of my endeavours to grow a range of fruit, veg and flowers from seed, grow organically, and my attempts to create a personal paradise with 1/2 acre of maintained gardens and 1/2 acre wild meadows. Northern Ireland's average daily high temperatures are 18 °C (64 °F) in July and 6 °C (43 °F) in January. Soil type: Clay

Thursday, 10 April 2014

Well Done Mark's Veg Plot

This week I did one of my favourite things... bought two gardening magazines while grocery shopping - which cost me £10 (nearly $20 US). Of course the May issue of Kitchen Garden magazine (pictured) included 10 packs of free herb seeds, which I decided I couldn't pass by. 

A few weeks ago a popular chef told me I must add dill and tarragon to my herb acquisition so I'm happy to report I now have dill and tarragon seeds to sow and grow. Most of the other free herbs (coriander, oregano, thyme, parsley, fennel, chives, chervil and basil) I have already, however, I will share with my garden group as we're focusing on herbs this year along with our heirloom garden development.

Skimming through the magazine what did I spot... Mark's Veg Plot featured on page 97. Well done Mark and it's great to see your blog promoted.
 

It can be hard to find time to read, but when I do have time my two favourite UK gardening magazines are 'Kitchen Garden' and 'Grow Your Own'. Anyone have any other reading recommendations - magazines or good gardening books, do tell? 

Copyright: All words and photos are property of Kelli's Northern Ireland Garden.

8 comments:

  1. I don't buy gardening mags any more as they seem just so expensive now - one I spotted last week was £5 with a free paperback to go with it I was almost tempted but decided against it - I think the free seeds draw a lot of people in though, even if it is something you don't really want to grow. Well done to Mark.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Here, we couldn't find a good gardening magazine. There are some magazine that contain gardening and raising animals, but they don't focus in gardening. How lucky you are.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Like Elaine we cancelled our garden mags as they tended to become repetitive. Mark will acquire celebrity status.

    ReplyDelete
  4. As Elaine, I have quit buying magazines because they are so costly. I couldn't resist one the other day, even had it in my cart. Then I put it back on the shelf as I remember the years of gardening magazines stacked in the office that I don't have the heart to throw away. On dill. Once you plant it, you will always have it. I love the smell as I walk past it. I had some growing in the front garden that came in wild. I left it for the bees and butterflies. Here the black swallowtail lays her eggs on dill. The caterpillars will munch away until time to metamorphose. My darling, creative granddaughter gathered dill seeds, placing them in an empty bird bath and apparently every where else because I now have dill all over. None the less, it will a great addition to your garden.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I've stopped buying gardening magazines as you can just about buy a book for the same price, though I do succumb when I see offers. I've recently had three copies of Kitchen Garden for £3, and it's good to see that Grow It has recently merged with it as I enjoyed both of these magazines.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I don't buy them often any-more as I have a good few years worth to fall back on.I do fall to temptation every now & then though & one ends up in my trolley.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks, for the mention, Kelli, but in truth it was a very small article about my blog. It will be a long time before I'm a celebrity! I must admit that I seldom buy magazines either. They provide only a small amount of interest at quite a steep price. I gave up buying TKG because most of the content had become "old hat" to me.

    ReplyDelete